Spyfall

Spyfall is, of course, a James Bond parody.  James Bond and Doctor Who are very different and while it is amusing to see Doctor Who pastiche elements of Bond (the briefing, the casino and dinner jacket, car chases and assassinations), it feels quite different to Bond, especially in the time travelling second half.  Inasmuch as it is Bond, it’s more For Your Eyes Only than The Spy Who Loved Me, a slow-burning character piece rather than an epic action spectacular.  In fact, the most effective scene is the horror/suspense sequence of the Kasaavin attacking the Australian agents in the Outback, which is not Bond at all.

The first part is brisk and effective, but the second episode falls apart a bit.  The cross-temporal story feels bitty, not lingering in any locale long enough to build up a sense of place or tension.  Daniel Barton is sidelined when we really need to see more of him and his plan.  Once O’s true identity is revealed, Barton goes from master villain to henchman, which is disappointing, as Lenny Henry was sinister in the first half and later in the lecture scene as he plan appears to be about to work.  I’m not sure why the Kasaavin want to turn everyone into computers or what Barton thinks he’s going to get out of it.  Info dump scenes where the villain reveals his whole plan are endemic to both Doctor Who and James Bond, so it’s no wonder the Master delivers a big one here.  Sacha Dhawan does at least portray a Master malevolent enough to make his plan seem reasonable, at least to a psychopath.

To be honest, I don’t like “celebrity historicals” much.  They seem to assume the audience are ignorant and lazy, info dumping information for context instead of leaving the audience the fun of independent research (let’s not forget Doctor Who was originally educational).  It leads to very stilted dialogue and storytelling.  Ada and Noor could each have their own episodes, whereas here they are reduced to bit-players.  A more focused episode two could have reduced the time travelling and spent more time on the Fam on the run.

The ontological paradox on the plane escape is a narrative flaw of a different kind, essentially just a cheat, and one already over-used by Steven Moffat.

Sacha Dhawan is probably the highlight of the story in what are essentially two different roles.  More than any other Master, he seems to be playing a part as O, not just wearing a mask.  He says he had “fun” impersonating O and appears to have taken the role seriously enough to work for MI6 to infiltrate properly (unlike the John Simm Master who faked Harold Saxon’s background).

The result is a story which starts well and is generally good when Dhawan is on screen, but which loses its way a bit.

Neglected Gems Part 4

The final part of my mini-series on unfairly neglected Doctor Who stories!

Fear Her

I’ve never understood the sheer hatred Fear Her has inspired since its broadcast.  Indifference I could understand, but not hatred.  To many fans, this is the worst episode of Russell T Davies’ time as showrunner, if not one of the worst of all time.

I concede that the monsters are subpar.  The father in the wardrobe conceit doesn’t really work.  We don’t see enough to really buy it as a threat, and what we do see isn’t scary enough.  And there is a huge dollop of sentimentality, especially over the Olympics.  But excess sentimentality is, in my opinion, a problem with a lot of Davies-era stories and never stopped episodes like Doomsday and Journey’s End topping polls.  At least in this story the Doctor and Rose seem likeable and believable, compared with other stories this season, where they often radiated smugness, acting like a couple of demi-gods who deigned to descend from Olympus to patronise us mere mortals.  The bit where Rose shoots daggers at the Doctor for eating marmalade out of the jar is one of my favourite Doctor/Rose bits in this season, not least for being done non-verbally.

I suspect the problem for a lot of people with this story is that it goes further into both fantasy and children’s fiction than Doctor Who usually ventures, and low fantasy at that, thus alienating all the fans who insist that Doctor Who is Serious Adult Science Fiction.  If you’re one of those fans, then this probably isn’t for you.  But please don’t stop me from liking it.

Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS

This story seems to get a lot of flack just for having a TARDIS interior without roundels.  In fact, the “roundels everywhere” approach is inconsistently applied in the original series – just see Inside the Spaceship (or The Edge of Destruction if you prefer) or The Invasion of TimeJourney to the Centre of the TARDIS is hardly flawless, with some confused plot elements that took me a couple of viewings to fully understand and a strange twist that requires the Doctor to fake a threat of destruction before the story introduces a real one. I have to say this is probably one of the weaker stories on this list for me.  However, the TARDIS is presented convincingly as a living labyrinth leaking time, the Doctor is quietly manipulative and there are some nice surreal moments even if they production team’s intentions didn’t quite meet the budget with some rooms reduced to views through doorways.

Under the Lake/Before the Flood

I was going to write about In the Forest of the Night, but much of what I said about Fear Her applies to it.  So I’ll go for Under the Lake/Before the Flood, which surprised me by appearing near the bottom of the poll for series nine.

I feel it has a lot going for it: the enclosed atmosphere of the first half (ghost story/base under siege hybrid) broadening out to the surreal abandoned mock-Soviet village of the second.  The time travel paradox is handled well (I like time-travel stories, but they’re rare outside of Moffat’s time on the show, except for Dennis Spooner’s tenure  as story editor*).  It’s very creepy even if the pseudoscientific explanations don’t entirely hold water (again, not unusual for Doctor Who).  There’s a decent monster too who towers over Peter Capaldi, although he isn’t seen much.  The story even gets away with breaking the fourth wall, just don’t ask me how (well, as we would find out a few episodes later, the Doctor always needs an audience).

Arachnids in the UK

I admit that I don’t know which Jodie Whittaker stories are considered good, beyond knowing that I’m in a minority in preferring her first season to her second.  Arachnids in the UK is a rather silly story, but a lot of fun, even if the not-Trump is a bit of a stock “evil American businessman.”  Giant creepy crawlies is something Doctor Who has done quite a bit, with varying degrees of efficiency.  It’s no surprise this feels like a bit of a throwback to the Pertwee era, with giant spiders, a corrupt businessman and an ecological theme.  Leaving all the spiders to die is a bit of a brutal ending though.

That said, my favourite bit only happened in my head: when the Doctor asks “Are all your hotels built on repurposed sites?” Robertson responds, “Some of them are built on Native American graveyards.”

*For more on the appearance of time travel stories under Dennis Spooner and Steven Moffat, see my book, Regeneration: The Changing Style of Doctor Who, by D. G. Saunders, available from Lulu.com and also Amazon US, Amazon UK, Blackwells and Barnes and Noble!

Regeneration: The Changing Style of Doctor Who – Out Now!

I’ve been away from here for too long.  The reason (part of the reason, anyway), is that I’ve been working on a book!  Regeneration: The Changing Style of Doctor Who by D. G. Saunders looks at all of television Doctor Who from An Unearthly Child to Resolution (sadly, there wasn’t enough time to add this year’s episodes), examining the way the series has changed with the changing priorities of different production teams.

From the back cover blurb:

For over fifty years, the BBC’s Doctor Who has taken viewers on adventures across time and space.  At the same time, the programme has crossed genres and styles.  From science fiction to action, horror to comedy and back again.

Regeneration: The Changing Style of Doctor Who offers a penetrating look at the way different showrunners, producers and script editors shaped the Time Lord’s adventures.  Analysing each era in sequence, it looks at story styles, the character of the Doctor and his intrepid companions, and the nature of the villains and monsters they faced, as well as the portrayal of the Time Lords.

An essential guide both for new fans wanting a primer on the programme’s history and for long-standing enthusiasts seeking a fresh perspective on eras they thought they knew.

Available NOW from Lulu.com, Blackwell’s, BarnesandNoble.com, Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com!